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Nashville College & University Expansion


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1 hour ago, Baronakim said:

ESa is  designing some fabulous new buildings at Belmont, but it is starting to remind me of the Roman Forum.  Imagine  if Belmont got a football team.  Could their new stadium look like the Flavian Ampitheatre perhaps?

Forget Belmont Bruins. Forever known as the Belmont Gladiators!

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On 10/5/2023 at 10:57 AM, Baronakim said:

ESa is  designing some fabulous new buildings at Belmont, but it is starting to remind me of the Roman Forum.  Imagine  if Belmont got a football team.  Could their new stadium look like the Flavian Ampitheatre perhaps?

I suspect Belmont, sooner than later based on their moving to the Missouri Valley Conference, will have a football program which would play at Geodis Park. Just my guess.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 10/31/2023 at 8:17 AM, markhollin said:

Belmont University Frist School of Medicine (6 stories, 160,000 sq. ft., internal garage) update.

Looking north from Acklen Ave.,  1/3 block east of 15th Ave. South:

Belmont Univ, Frist School of Medicine, Oct 29, 2023, 1.jpeg


Looking south from Wedgewood Ave. at 14th Ave. South:

Belmont Univ, Frist School of Medicine, Oct 29, 2023, 2.jpeg

Perhaps I'm being hypercritical, but I don't really like how this building is turning out. Greek Revival is one of my favorite styles of architecture, this is a poor execution of it. Proportions are wrong, the blend of neoclassical styles and modern materials isn't right, and the lines don't work. The big curved porch clashes with the geometry of the Corinthian columns, and the large modernist glass walls clash with the classical columns and porch roofs. The flanking porticos on the rear (I think it's the rear) with the peaked roofs clash and look strangely disproportionate with the large central columns. The worst offender though, I think, is the blending of the plaster/stucco facing material over the stone and columns, which just makes it look like they ran out of money halfway through.

The bottom half is pretty decent (except for the big windows and curved porch), but the top half looks like a Hampton Inn.

Edited by Nathan_in_DC
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2 hours ago, Nathan_in_DC said:

Perhaps I'm being hypercritical, but I don't really like how this building is turning out. Greek Revival is one of my favorite styles of architecture, this is a poor execution of it. Proportions are wrong, the blend of neoclassical styles and modern materials isn't right, and the lines don't work. The big curved porch clashes with the geometry of the Corinthian columns, and the large modernist glass walls clash with the classical columns and porch roofs. The flanking porticos on the rear (I think it's the rear) with the peaked roofs clash and look strangely disproportionate with the large central columns. The worst offender though, I think, is the blending of the plaster/stucco facing material over the stone and columns, which just makes it look like they ran out of money halfway through.

The bottom half is pretty decent (except for the big windows and curved porch), but the top half looks like a Hampton Inn.

Yes, you are.

 

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8 hours ago, Nathan_in_DC said:

I just have high expectations from Belmont!

That and I'm not happy if I'm not complaining about something. 😜

Ah.  I well understand as I often feel the same way.  However, I fail to appreciate your attitude somewhat in that you dis the "classical" value of the architecture at Belmont, but I recall little to nothing from you concening the architectural hodge-podge of the endless row of new dorms on West End Avenue.  Allow me to pontificate.  While I very much like the character of the Vanderbilt psuedohistoric  wall against modernity (especialiy as I winced every time I passed the atrocious Carmicheal monstrosities, having worked for the firm that designed them at the time),  the difference between Belmont and Vanderbilt seems apples and oranges.   I must shake my head in your analysis of the the failure of ESa (as i was also employed there for decades) to fulfill "classical" Greek standards of design.  I must point out that there was NOTHING in historical Greeck architecture approaching the scale, complexity or multiple uses of the many new educational structures at Belmont.  I would further point out that many of the "failures"  that you seem to put forward are architectural constraints which, if the ancient builders had access, would have been gleefully used in a heartbeat.   For instance the lovely column spacing on Greek temples was not due to an  excessive love of colonades, but rather that they lacked structural technology to allow fewer columns with wider spacing.  They had no arches or vaulting per se and the span between columns was very limited therefore.  You have not lived around here where so many of our churches and college buildings totally ignore Vignola's proportions in design...such terribly skinny architraves, boring low and stretched pediments, and especially columns so skinny as to appear as ludicrous as a person bereft of proper pants.  From your emphasis of love for Greek Revival, I should perhaps wonder if you also object to Nashille's Parthenon being constructed of concrete rather than cararra marble and it's failure  to be accurately painted in the garish colors which were univerally employed in the original.  I recall one fervent critic, a silly preacher, who publicly remarked that the Parthenon was "no place" for a pagan idol of Athena.  Such ignorange of history here is typical, I fear.  Surely you must grant lattitude given  the excellent classical design of the Fisher Center for Performing Arts also by ESa.  Of course no such corresponding enclosed facilities for performance existed in Greece 2,500 years ago, so today we must wing it.  Note that the scale of these buildings is more in keeping with the later Roman period where they had developed newer technologies such as architectural concrete employed by the Pantheon.  Of course the "classical" Victorians ohhed and ahhed over a stark white and stripped down version of history of which we know today as very incorrect.  IMO you are missing the point of the academic buildings at Belmont and perhaps even Vanderbilt.  While none of them are 'architecturally correct" with their historic antecedents,  they do present a magnificent bulwark exemplifying the importance of education in our city, historically and presently.

image.jpeg

images.jpg

Edited by Baronakim
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  • 2 weeks later...

Belmont University's Caldwell Hall II (11 stories, 714 beds, 4,134 sq. ft. of ground level retail) has landed a foundation permit worth $2.18 million to advance ongoing work on the site. 

More behind the paywall at the Nashville Post here:

https://www.nashvillepost.com/business/development/real-estate-notes-three-tower-project-effort-advances/article_237bc744-984a-11ee-b54e-63a4a8e8783f.html

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